Practical and Effective Entryway and Hallway Design Tips

This is a guest post by Gabrielle Green of TipsOnHowToSaveMoney.

chic entryway
image via Ore Studios/Pinterest
I have been writing about preparing to move for months now. It was an overwhelming, yet exciting experience all at once. Now that we are settled (relatively speaking) we can finally focus on decorating and making the house our home.

We came up with a practical plan both financially and for tackling the decorating — room-by-room, area-by-area. For us, that meant the first order of business was the entryway. With a busy household we wanted to construct an entryway that was well-designed, simple and uncluttered, and good to go for everyday use.

Before designing your entryway answer these questions:

You first need to start the design process by defining the space. How often do you entertain in your home? If often, you need a place to keep your guests’ things when they visit.

Does your family set out for the day by exiting this part of the home? Is this also the entrance that visitors use? Storage for umbrellas, briefcases, and winter clothing is essential.

Entryway Decorating Tips

Take off the closet door to make extra space.

In our home everything converges by the front door and leaves a big mess that is often untidy and tripped on. As such, one of the main focal points of the entryway was to pick a bench that we could use to store shoes, sports gear, backpacks, and more. But more than that, we wanted to create a space that would give first-time visitors to our home a warm and welcoming impression.

Entryway benches are practical and come in a variety of different styles and types from hardwood to vintage, so matching your decor shouldn’t be too strenuous of a task. I think what I liked most is that entryway benches are affordable. Even a simple wrought iron bench can add a design element and warm feeling that welcomes your guests to your home. If a bench is simply too overpowering for the area, consider storage bins.

Bursts of color dramatically change the visual appeal of an entryway. Red, for instance, is not only bright, but also warm and inviting for visitors.

It has been said that painting your interior door black can instantly make the area look more expensive than it really is.

Photos place in an ascending style along a staircase not only provides a personal touch, but it also creates an inviting atmosphere that grabs your guests’ attention.

If your entryway lacks wall and/or floor space, pick one area to focus on. Adding something as simple as a slim table with a vase or candle can quickly and affordably elevate the space.

Many designers say the most important foyer accessory is a mirror, but that will really depend on the amount of space you have and the architecture. When guests come in or head out, a quick glance in the mirror is always good; but further, a mirror bounces light in small places making it bright and cheery.

Other items that can accentuate the area are artwork or a live plant, but it is important to keep clutter to a minimum. A small area can easily be overrun by too many people, so limiting unnecessary furniture and extra knickknacks will keep the area from feeling claustrophobic.

The above tips can help you get started with your own entryway design. Make it fun and make it practical so it works for you and also works so that the kids and family can easily stow their items until they need them again tomorrow.

Tweet about this on Twitter10Share on Facebook0Share on Google+0Pin on Pinterest0Share on StumbleUpon0

4 thoughts on “Practical and Effective Entryway and Hallway Design Tips

  1. These are great tips! I use several already (we have a Pottery Barn style locker system to gather our clutter in lieu of a bench, we have a mirror in the entry hall, and we have photos lining our stairs). I wasn’t aware of the color tricks though! Definitely going to add some red and perhaps paint our door…..

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>